#GivingTuesday: Let’s Make a Difference Together

Today is #GivingTuesday, a global day of generosity. What a great way to make a difference in the lives of others!

Donating money is great but there are other ways you can give to important causes, such as:

–Make care packages for those staying in a shelter.
–Read books to underprivileged children.
–Drive someone to the doctor or pick up their medicine.
–Become a big sister/big brother to at-risk youths.
–Visit the elderly at a nursing home.
–Donate your time and expertise to a local candidate’s political campaign.

I’m considering buying a set of picture books that are all centered around the central theme of giving to others. My thought is that I would read one book each week to children attending a local head start or elementary school, & then donating the books to their library. Seems like a great way to give of myself, hang out with kids, & encourage them to also become givers!

What are other ways you can think of to participate in #GivingTuesday? How are you going to make a difference in the lives of others today?

 

Dr. Roberta Ross-Fisher is a national leader in quality assurance, educator preparation, and empowerment-based learning. She supports educational institutions and non-profit agencies in areas such as accreditation, competency-based education, and teacher/school leader prep programs design.  Roberta also writes about academic excellence and can be contacted for consultations, webinars, and on-site workshops through her site (www.robertarossfisher.com). 

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Higher Education & Political Affiliation: Does it Matter? Yes, and No…

About six-in-ten Americans (61%) say the higher education system in the United States is going in the wrong direction, according to a new 2018 Pew Research Center survey. Political party affiliation seems to have an impact on their perceptions in many respects, but not in all. Here are some highlights:

Political views influence voters’ perceptions about higher education.

  • Nearly 3/4 of those with conservative views believe that higher education is headed in the wrong direction:
    • Republican leaning: 73%
    • Democrat leaning: 52%
  • There’s a big difference in the viewpoints regarding faculty influence: Professors are bringing their political and social views into the classroom, and it’s having a negative impact on higher education.
    • Republican leaning: 79%
    • Democrat leaning: 17%
  • Conservatives think there’s too much emphasis on being politically correct: Colleges and universities are too concerned about protecting students from viewpoints they might find offensive.
    • Republican learning: 79%
    • Democrat leaning: 31%

 

Age influences perception about faculty impact.

Regardless of their political affiliation, more older Americans place blame at the feet of faculty for problems in higher education. However, those who are Republican-leaning feel more strongly than their counterparts:

  • 65+ years (Republicans 96%, Democrats 32%)
  • 50-64 years (Republicans 85%, Democrats 15%)
  • 35-49 years (Republicans 73%, Democrats 10%)
  • 18-34 years (Republicans 58%, Democrats 19%)

Regardless of their political leanings, everyone thinks going to college costs too much.

  • There’s lots of common ground when it comes to affordability: Higher education tuition costs are too high.
    • Democrat learning: 92%
    • Republican leaning: 77%

Most agree that higher education needs to do a better job of preparing graduates for the workforce.

  • Regardless of political party affiliation, Americans recognize the importance of a well-rounded education that includes career readiness: Students aren’t getting the skills they need to succeed in the workplace.
    • Republican leaning: 73%
    • Democrat leaning: 56%

 

So, what does all this mean? And how can we use these insights to improve higher education for all Americans?

Results from this year’s Pew Research Poll prove something we already knew: There are definitely some big differences in the way people view higher education, depending on their political party affiliation. However, there are some areas in which nearly everyone can agree, such as:

1.)    We have room for improvement in higher education. We can agree that we have some of the best colleges and universities anywhere. Students from all around the world come to the United States to attend our institutions because they want the benefit of an American education. However, despite all the positives we can place in the “plus” column, we as a nation know we can do even better when it comes to providing exceptional higher education experiences. More importantly, we want to do better, because we take our role as a global educational leader seriously.

2.)    We must find a way to reduce the cost of attending college. It’s true that nearly everything costs more today than it did 25 years ago; a quick trip to the grocery store, building center, or car dealership will confirm that. It’s the same with higher education. Granted, there are some expenses over which colleges and universities have no control. However, there are areas where costs could be reduced, such as offering students the option of purchasing digital textbooks rather than hard copies, or partnering with other universities for more purchasing power. We can also look at fresh ways to cut or freeze tuition and expand work study programs. Paid internships sponsored by workforce partners would be of tremendous value in making college more affordable.

3.)    Once they’re enrolled, institutions must be committed to each student’s success. Colleges and universities are great at getting students enrolled, but many feel it’s up to the student to succeed once they begin their studies. Wrong! When a college admits a student, it should partner with that learner to support his or her success, from the time of matriculation to graduation. This partnership should represent a “WIT” approach–Whatever It Takes—to help that student succeed and graduate. Does that mean watering down the curriculum? No! Does it mean handing out passing grades when they aren’t deserved? Of course not! But when an institution enrolls a student, it means that the student has demonstrated a propensity for success based on that institution’s admission requirements. When a college accepts a student’s money they should provide them with the kind of academic support they need to succeed. For example, helping students to succeed through mentoring programs can provide a much-needed safety net for at-risk students, and it’s truly a “win-win” for all parties involved. When a student is successful, they stay in school. When they stay in school they graduate. When they graduate, they are able to attain their professional goals and provide for their family. And when these things happen, college retention, graduation, and satisfaction rates all increase, which keeps accreditors happy. Given all this, why wouldn’t every higher education institution in the nation want to do all they could to support the success of their students?

4.)    Higher education must revisit their curriculum and place a greater emphasis on real-world application of content knowledge. There needs to be a proper balance between theory and application, and students should receive multiple opportunities to practice what they are learning within structured field experiences and internships regardless of their major. Moreover, they must receive the benefit of supervision and support from a qualified workforce mentor. As a result, students will develop important skills sets, establish positive relationships, and are able to connect what they’re learning in the classroom with the real world.

Let’s Put Those Differences Aside…

While it’s certainly true that Republicans and Democrats view certain aspects of higher education quite differently, it’s also true that there are many areas where we can agree. Let’s start there. Let’s agree to put our political labels on a shelf, remember our shared commitment to academic excellence, and work together to make our higher education system even better for all Americans.

Dr. Roberta Ross-Fisher is a national leader in quality assurance, educator preparation, and empowerment-based learning. She supports educational institutions and non-profit agencies in areas such as accreditation, competency-based education, and teacher/school leader prep programs design.  Roberta also writes about academic excellence and can be contacted for consultations, webinars, and on-site workshops through her site (www.robertarossfisher.com). 

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Unhealthy People, Unhealthy Towns: A Healthcare Crisis in Rural America

The Chronicle of Higher Education is a nationally respected publication that serves the world of academia—primarily colleges and universities across the United States and abroad. Understandably, it tends to focus on topics of interest to faculty and administrators such as how to address current issues in course curriculum, funding challenges, federal regulations, and the like.  However, late last year the Chronicle published a piece that focused on life in an area of rural southeast Missouri known as the Bootheel; A Dying Town was grounded in research findings that connected the dots between education and health. The findings: “Educational disparities…economic malaise and lack of opportunity are making people…in the Bootheel sick. And maybe even killing them.”

Since 2014, eight healthcare facilities in rural Missouri have closed, including four hospitals. The most recent casualty is the only hospital in Ripley County, scheduled to close October 15, 2018. Nearly all have been located in the southeastern part of the state and the situation has been deemed as a crisis with no end in sight.

The most recent data from iVantage Health Analytics paints a bleak picture for healthcare not just in Missouri but in many states. As dire as the situation is in rural southeast Missouri residents of Mississippi, Texas, Louisiana, and Georgia have even higher rates of healthcare vulnerability.

Factors that Impact Closures

iVantage data confirm more Americans than ever before have access to the healthcare they need because of the Affordable Care Act, but considerable gaps remain. The group identified twelve Health Disparities metrics that make hospitals and clinics particularly vulnerable to closure:

  • Adult Obesity Rate
  • Child Poverty Rate
  • Unemployment
  • No Medical Insurance
  • Healthcare Costs
  • Smoking
  • Access to Affordable, Safe Housing
  • Access to Mental Health Providers
  • Diabetes Screening Rate
  • Access to Primary Care Physicians
  • Access to Dental Care Providers
  • High School Graduation Rate

 

Areas with the greatest percentage of health disparities are those most vulnerable to hospital closure. In other words, those who need quality healthcare the most are the ones who will be left behind.  

Far-Reaching Impact

The problem of closing hospitals and clinics doesn’t just mean residents will have to drive a little farther to see a doctor; it has far-reaching economic impact. When residents do not have access to quality healthcare, they aren’t able to work; this impacts local business and industry productivity. When they earn less money, workers don’t have as much to spend in local grocery stores, gas stations, or restaurants. When sick children aren’t able to go to school, local districts receive less funding. And, when facilities close, local residents trained in healthcare lose their jobs and are often forced to move elsewhere for work. In other words, unhealthy residents lead to unhealthy towns.

It’s Time to Roll Up Our Sleeves

The closing of hospitals isn’t just a rural Missouri problem—nor are poverty, housing, or the lack of education. There are towns all across our country in desperate need of resuscitation on many fronts. Every dying town takes a toll on its state, and eventually on our great nation. These problems are not going to take care of themselves, and it is essential that we tackle them together.

 

Dr. Roberta Ross-Fisher is a national leader in quality assurance, educator preparation, and empowerment-based learning. She supports educational institutions and non-profit agencies in areas such as accreditation, competency-based education, and teacher/school leader prep programs design.  Roberta also writes about academic excellence and can be contacted for consultations, webinars, and on-site workshops through her site (www.robertarossfisher.com). 

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Think-Speak-Learn-Grow: Active Citizenship through Active Learning

She doesn’t know it, but Heather Wolpert-Gawron got my morning off to a good start. I just read that the 2017-2018 Missouri Educator of the Year is working with middle level students to help them to hone their speech and debate skills. On surface that may not sound groundbreaking or earth-shattering, but I’ve felt for a long time that it’s a very important skill we should be promoting in our P-12 schools.

Wolpert-Gawron teaches at Greenwood Laboratory School in Springfield, Missouri. The school was originally established in 1908 as part of the teacher training curriculum at Springfield Normal School but has been associated with Missouri State University for many years. In fact, I’m proud to say that I completed my student teaching at Greenwood many years ago and am pleased it has maintained its reputation for innovative instructional practices.

Ms. Wolpert-Gawron correctly observed that most P-12 students have no problem expressing themselves in social situations with their peers—the difficulty comes when they are asked to apply what they have learned about a given topic and communicate on a more formal level. In my opinion, it is extremely important to teach our students how to think critically, analyze, articulate a position, and engage in thoughtful, meaningful discussions with others. In a nutshell we really need to be teaching all the Language Arts, which are broadly comprised of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Some additional key skills that can be developed in association with the Language Arts include:

  • Formulating arguments without being argumentative
  • Disagreeing without being disagreeable
  • Knowing what you stand for, and then being able to defend it
  • Using your knowledge for good – to effect positive change
  • Feeling empowered to make a difference

Students who are taught these skills and given opportunities to hone them will become much more confident thinkers, writers, and speakers. They will grow up to become valuable employees, entrepreneurs, and political leaders. Most importantly, by teaching language arts skills including debate, these students will become informed, confident, articulate, and empowered citizens of our great nation. In other words, Active civitate opus effectum positivum mutation. – “Active citizenship to effect positive change.” I can think of no better gift to give to our students, or to our nation.

–rrf

 

Dr. Roberta Ross-Fisher is a national leader in quality assurance, educator preparation, and empowerment-based learning. She supports educational institutions and non-profit agencies in areas such as accreditation, competency-based education, and teacher/school leader prep programs design.  Roberta also writes about academic excellence and can be contacted for consultations, webinars, and on-site workshops through her site (www.robertarossfisher.com). 

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HELP WANTED: EXCEPTIONAL LEADERS. OTHERS NEED NOT APPLY.

HELP WANTED: An exceptional leader who desires to make a positive and lasting impact on the lives of others. This individual must be able to: work well under stress; collaborate with others; manage and lead; inspire and motivate; and yield results. The ideal candidate will demonstrate the following attributes:

  • High moral standards
  • Strict personal ethics
  • Executive energy
  • Exceptional organization skills
  • Artful communication skills
  • Loyalty

 

It’s difficult to find individuals who meet these criteria; isn’t it? Over the years we’ve gotten used to settling for less than the very best. Sometimes we settle because we’re in a hurry to fill a position; other times we’re more focused on saving a few bucks so we hire someone less qualified, less experienced, less committed, and less successful. In some instances, individuals come along who possess few of the skills we’re looking for, but they are charismatic and convincing, only to leave a path of destruction for others to clean up. Regardless of the reason, we eventually we pay a price for not insisting on hiring the very best leaders.

There actually is one individual who meets all the criteria above—it’s Robert Frances Kennedy. In fact, he was described in this way by his brother, President John F. Kennedy, in an interview with Newsweek magazine in early 1963 (Matthews 2017).  In respectful observance of his tragic death this week in 1968, I think it’s important that we reflect on what true leadership is. We need more leaders today like Bobby Kennedy, and we need to be teaching leadership skills in our P-12 schools to nurture those qualities in our young people so they in turn can fill important societal roles in the future. President Kennedy said that anybody can have ideas—the problem lies in actually making them happen. Helping students to identify problems, develop ideas for solving those problems, and then taking action to yield results are important skills that schools should build into their curriculum starting in kindergarten.

Since my field is education, that is the lens through which I look most often. But I think real leaders probably possess many of the same attributes, skills, and dispositions regardless of which sector they serve in. Specifically:

In addition to building a vision for the future, developing a strategic plan, and setting high but attainable expectations, a leader’s major role is to motivate and inspire others; to model effective and ethical practice; and to facilitate growth in other team members.

I think there is a distinction between management and leadership, but they are intertwined on many levels. Those assigned to roles of responsibility must be adept at both.

Successful management is one piece of advancing the institution’s mission, but leaders must be careful not to micromanage because it can signal a lack of trust, breed confusion and ultimately, can productivity and success. Delegate responsibilities to others when appropriate but lead when necessary.

I believe an effective leader must be truly committed to academic excellence. By setting high expectations for ethical practice and academic outcomes, a leader can inspire others to achieve great things.

Likewise, an effective leader must have confidence. It is difficult to lead others when we don’t communicate that we truly believe the path being taken is the right one.

An effective leader must ensure proper recognition of other team members for their contributions, particularly in the context of a significant or challenging project. It’s necessary to motivate and inspire, but we must also show appreciation and recognition.

And finally, an effective leader must be prepared to make tough decisions. He or she must be willing and able to make the decisions necessary to ensure program quality, because if a leader fails in that arena he or she simply is not doing the job they were hired to do.

The bottom line is that an effective leader must wholeheartedly believe in the cause he or she is leading—must be completely committed to success—and must treat others with respect and appreciation.

For so many reasons, I truly wish Bobby Kennedy was still with us. But, we can still learn from him and others like him. We must commit to building a nation of true leaders. I think our way of life depends on it.

–rrf

Dr. Roberta Ross-Fisher is a national leader in educator preparation, accreditation, online learning, and academic quality assurance. An accomplished presenter, writer, and educator, she currently supports higher education, P-12 schools, and non-profit agencies in areas such as competency-based education, new program design, gap analysis, quality assurance, leadership, outcomes-based assessment, and accreditation through her company, Global Educational Consulting, LLC. She also writes about academic excellence and can be contacted for consultations through her blog site (www.robertarossfisher.com).

 

 

Matthews, C. (2017). Bobby Kennedy: A raging spirit. New York: Simon & Schuster.

A True Education

“The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education.” – Martin Luther King Jr.

This philosophy as articulated so eloquently by Dr. King should steer the mission and vision of every P-12 and higher education institution in our nation, whether it be public, private, charter, or homeschool. The strength of our nation depends on an educated society—a society whose citizens are intellectually curious and who possess the ability to read and think critically.

Many years ago, I heard a pastor say, “You have to be able to separate the grass from the weeds.” This is the essence of critical reading and critical thinking: being able to comprehend, analyze, and evaluate what one is hearing and reading, and then drawing well-informed conclusions that perpetuate a solid body of knowledge that we can rely on.

However, as Dr. King cautioned us, simply having this ability is not enough—it’s what we do with it that’s important. That’s where character comes in, because simply being smart or informed doesn’t mean we are educated—we must use our knowledge to positively impact the lives of others–to serve the greater good. This requires a solid core of ethics and integrity—an inner compass. It requires being a person of your word so that others can count on you. It requires you to do the right thing even when no one else is looking. It mandates that we take a different path, even when it may be lonely or unpopular. Learning builds our brain, but character builds our core. When coupled together, the result is an individual who is a lifelong learner, who carefully considers and reflects, and one who uses his or her knowledge to make the world a better place.

I challenge every educator (teacher, school leader, paraprofessional, parent, curriculum director, etc.) to take a moment to seriously reflect and consider: Where does YOUR school fit on this continuum of academic excellence? Are you contributing to providing your students with a true education, as defined by Dr. King? If not, why not? What is holding you back? What would you need to light this match and make it happen? Make a commitment and get started. Today.

–rrf

 

Dr. Roberta Ross-Fisher is a national leader in educator preparation, accreditation, online learning, and academic quality assurance. An accomplished presenter, writer, and educator, she currently supports higher education, P-12 schools, and non-profit agencies in areas such as competency-based education, new program design, gap analysis, quality assurance, leadership, outcomes-based assessment, and accreditation through her company, Global Educational Consulting, LLC. She also writes about academic excellence and can be contacted for consultations through her blog site (www.robertarossfisher.com).